Before submitting work, writers are strongly advised to familiarize themselves with the journal. Check out print issues, our online content, or our archives

Please submit in between 3-6 poems, not to exceed a total of 12 pages. 

MQR does not accept previously published pieces.  

Guest Edited by Reginald Dwayne Betts

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MQR is seeking submissions to a special issue focused on the struggles people around the world face with correctional, disciplinary, and punitive systems such as criminal justice, incarceration, occupation, immigration regimes, and political and social repression. We want to hear from voices that chronicle, engage and analyze the emergent rhetoric of persecution, and that shed light on its roots and the impact it has had on public discourse and the lives of individuals. We are looking for stories, poems, and essays that probe and narrate experiences of persecution as well as the spiritual, discursive, and political means of resisting social and institutional punishment, oppression and maltreatment.

Submit interviews, book reviews, craft essays, and general nonfiction related to arts & culture. Essays should not be longer than 3,000 words. Please only send book reviews for titles published within the last 12 months. If there are photos to accompany your piece, please make a note in your cover letter. Payment is $30 per piece.


Please note that we are not currently reading fiction or poetry for MQR Online. Poems and short stories for the print journal should be submitted to their respective categories in Submittable.

Guest Edited by Reginald Dwayne Betts

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MQR is seeking submissions to a special issue focused on the struggles people around the world face with correctional, disciplinary, and punitive systems such as criminal justice, incarceration, occupation, immigration regimes, and political and social repression. We want to hear from voices that chronicle, engage and analyze the emergent rhetoric of persecution, and that shed light on its roots and the impact it has had on public discourse and the lives of individuals. We are looking for stories, poems, and essays that probe and narrate experiences of persecution as well as the spiritual, discursive, and political means of resisting social and institutional punishment, oppression and maltreatment. 


Manuscripts should be double-spaced, right margins not justified. 1,500 words minimum, 5,000 average, 7,000 maximum.
MQR does not accept previously published pieces.
All reviews and interviews should be submitted to MQR Online 

Guest Edited by Reginald Dwayne Betts

--

MQR is seeking submissions to a special issue focused on the struggles people around the world face with correctional, disciplinary, and punitive systems such as criminal justice, incarceration, occupation, immigration regimes, and political and social repression. We want to hear from voices that chronicle, engage and analyze the emergent rhetoric of persecution, and that shed light on its roots and the impact it has had on public discourse and the lives of individuals. We are looking for stories, poems, and essays that probe and narrate experiences of persecution as well as the spiritual, discursive, and political means of resisting social and institutional punishment, oppression and maltreatment.

Manuscripts should be double-spaced, right margins not justified. 1,500 words minimum, 5,000 average, 7,000 maximum.
MQR does not accept previously published pieces.  

Guest Edited by Reginald Dwayne Betts
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All fiction accepted for publication is passed on to a judge as a finalist for the $2,000 Lawrence Prize. The Lawrence Prize is awarded annually to a story published in the journal that year.  No additional fee beyond submission. The 2019 winner will be announced in April 2020. 

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MQR is seeking submissions to a special issue focused on the struggles people around the world face with correctional, disciplinary, and punitive systems such as criminal justice, incarceration, occupation, immigration regimes, and political and social repression. We want to hear from voices that chronicle, engage and analyze the emergent rhetoric of persecution, and that shed light on its roots and the impact it has had on public discourse and the lives of individuals. We are looking for stories, poems, and essays that probe and narrate experiences of persecution as well as the spiritual, discursive, and political means of resisting social and institutional punishment, oppression and maltreatment. 

Michigan Quarterly Review